A juvenile snapping turtle born at the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre (KTTC).

A juvenile snapping turtle born at the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre (KTTC).

  An x-ray shows a fish hook ingested by a turtle admitted for rehabiliation. 

An x-ray shows a fish hook ingested by a turtle admitted for rehabiliation. 

  This painted turtle's injuries, resulting from a collision with an automobile, are typical to patients at the KTTC.

This painted turtle's injuries, resulting from a collision with an automobile, are typical to patients at the KTTC.

  Sue Carstairs, facility administrator and lead veterinarian, updates the treatment board, which keeps track of the ongoing care of patients.

Sue Carstairs, facility administrator and lead veterinarian, updates the treatment board, which keeps track of the ongoing care of patients.

  In order to prevent the cross contamination of bacteria, each patient is housed in its own solitary “tank”.

In order to prevent the cross contamination of bacteria, each patient is housed in its own solitary “tank”.

  Volunteer Kathleen Church weighs and evaluates juvenile turtles at the KTTC.

Volunteer Kathleen Church weighs and evaluates juvenile turtles at the KTTC.

  A juvenile map turtle at the KTTC.

A juvenile map turtle at the KTTC.

  At the KTTC each “tank” houses a single patient. With a large increase in trauma victims each year, the KTTC is quickly outgrowing its current space.

At the KTTC each “tank” houses a single patient. With a large increase in trauma victims each year, the KTTC is quickly outgrowing its current space.

  Two map turtles bask in their tank at the KTTC.

Two map turtles bask in their tank at the KTTC.

  A juvenile map turtle basks in the warmth of a hot lamp.

A juvenile map turtle basks in the warmth of a hot lamp.

  Juvenile painted turtle.

Juvenile painted turtle.

  This snapping turtle is one among thousands of turtles who are victims of automobile trauma every year in Ontario. 

This snapping turtle is one among thousands of turtles who are victims of automobile trauma every year in Ontario. 

  Volunteer Sam Conroy prepares a favourite treat for the turtles of the KTTC.

Volunteer Sam Conroy prepares a favourite treat for the turtles of the KTTC.

  Juvenile snapping turtles hatched at the KTTC. These younglings will be carefully raised until they are ready to be released back into the wild.

Juvenile snapping turtles hatched at the KTTC. These younglings will be carefully raised until they are ready to be released back into the wild.

  Volunteer Jamielyn Stevenson cleans a turtle tank at the KTTC. With volunteers numbering around 100, the Centre could not operate without their generous help.

Volunteer Jamielyn Stevenson cleans a turtle tank at the KTTC. With volunteers numbering around 100, the Centre could not operate without their generous help.

  KTTC employee Kate Siena examines the injuries of a painted turtle inflicted by an automobile.

KTTC employee Kate Siena examines the injuries of a painted turtle inflicted by an automobile.

  KTTC employee Kate Siena holds a juvenile painted turtle hatched at the KTTC over the winter.

KTTC employee Kate Siena holds a juvenile painted turtle hatched at the KTTC over the winter.

  An adult painted turtle enjoys some time under the lights.

An adult painted turtle enjoys some time under the lights.

  Quiet Please.

Quiet Please.

  A juvenile snapping turtle born at the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre (KTTC).
  An x-ray shows a fish hook ingested by a turtle admitted for rehabiliation. 
  This painted turtle's injuries, resulting from a collision with an automobile, are typical to patients at the KTTC.
  Sue Carstairs, facility administrator and lead veterinarian, updates the treatment board, which keeps track of the ongoing care of patients.
  In order to prevent the cross contamination of bacteria, each patient is housed in its own solitary “tank”.
  Volunteer Kathleen Church weighs and evaluates juvenile turtles at the KTTC.
  A juvenile map turtle at the KTTC.
  At the KTTC each “tank” houses a single patient. With a large increase in trauma victims each year, the KTTC is quickly outgrowing its current space.
  Two map turtles bask in their tank at the KTTC.
  A juvenile map turtle basks in the warmth of a hot lamp.
  Juvenile painted turtle.
  This snapping turtle is one among thousands of turtles who are victims of automobile trauma every year in Ontario. 
  Volunteer Sam Conroy prepares a favourite treat for the turtles of the KTTC.
  Juvenile snapping turtles hatched at the KTTC. These younglings will be carefully raised until they are ready to be released back into the wild.
  Volunteer Jamielyn Stevenson cleans a turtle tank at the KTTC. With volunteers numbering around 100, the Centre could not operate without their generous help.
  KTTC employee Kate Siena examines the injuries of a painted turtle inflicted by an automobile.
  KTTC employee Kate Siena holds a juvenile painted turtle hatched at the KTTC over the winter.
  An adult painted turtle enjoys some time under the lights.
  Quiet Please.

A juvenile snapping turtle born at the Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre (KTTC).

An x-ray shows a fish hook ingested by a turtle admitted for rehabiliation. 

This painted turtle's injuries, resulting from a collision with an automobile, are typical to patients at the KTTC.

Sue Carstairs, facility administrator and lead veterinarian, updates the treatment board, which keeps track of the ongoing care of patients.

In order to prevent the cross contamination of bacteria, each patient is housed in its own solitary “tank”.

Volunteer Kathleen Church weighs and evaluates juvenile turtles at the KTTC.

A juvenile map turtle at the KTTC.

At the KTTC each “tank” houses a single patient. With a large increase in trauma victims each year, the KTTC is quickly outgrowing its current space.

Two map turtles bask in their tank at the KTTC.

A juvenile map turtle basks in the warmth of a hot lamp.

Juvenile painted turtle.

This snapping turtle is one among thousands of turtles who are victims of automobile trauma every year in Ontario. 

Volunteer Sam Conroy prepares a favourite treat for the turtles of the KTTC.

Juvenile snapping turtles hatched at the KTTC. These younglings will be carefully raised until they are ready to be released back into the wild.

Volunteer Jamielyn Stevenson cleans a turtle tank at the KTTC. With volunteers numbering around 100, the Centre could not operate without their generous help.

KTTC employee Kate Siena examines the injuries of a painted turtle inflicted by an automobile.

KTTC employee Kate Siena holds a juvenile painted turtle hatched at the KTTC over the winter.

An adult painted turtle enjoys some time under the lights.

Quiet Please.

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